Guardians of the Galaxy videos shine the spotlight on leadership both in and out of combat

Posted on September 23, 2021 by

Two new Guardians of the Galaxy videos have been released, and in them, senior gameplay director Patrick Fortier discusses how players can lead their team of intergalactic misfits.

In the first video, Fortier discusses how the Guardians synergize in battle, while the second focuses on how players can lead the Guardians outside of it.

Each of the crew have their own distinct personalities out of combat, and each have their own unique specialties and abilities on the battlefield. For example, Rocket serves as the group’s multi-target explosive specialist, Groot as its protector and healer, Drax as its wrecking ball, Gamora as its single-target assassin, and Star-Lord as a versatile leader.

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Europa Universalis 4 is going free on the Epic Store EU4's Emperor expansion, featuring an emperor.

Posted on September 23, 2021 by


Have you ever thought to yourself, “I'd really like to try one of those massive Paradox grand strategy games, but I don't want to invest any money into it because the whole thing is likely to end quickly and badly?” I certainly have. Then one day, many years ago, I threw caution to the wind and bought Europa Universalis: Rome, determined to scratch that itch. 30 minutes later, as I flipped hopelessly through the phone book-sized manual, I realized that I had been right all along. I was way out of my depth.

The good news for anyone in a similar situation is that you will soon have the opportunity to embark on a journey of grand strategy self-discovery without having to drop a penny: The acclaimed Europa Universalis 4, “a textured and engrossing simulation that conquers the common ground between your average Civilization V player and the long-time devotees of grand strategy,” is slated to go free next week on the Epic Games Store.

This is the base game and not one of the many bundles that are listed on Steam, but EU4 will be a new addition to the Epic Store, so we may see some of that add-on content—and, one would think, more Paradox games—headed that way in the future. Even without any extra content, though, this is a huge and unexpectedly accessible (relatively speaking, anyway) strategy experience.

Ahead of that, though, is The Escapists, this week's giveaway game, an also-acclaimed indie prison break simulator. Do it quietly (dig a tunnel), do it loud (start a riot), or do something else entirely—it doesn't matter, as long as you get out. Epic still doesn't support user ratings but it's got a “very good” overall ranking across more than 13,000 user reviews on Steam (it's been out since 2015), and that's pretty solid stuff. 

This isn't The Escapists' first free week on the Epic Store, incidentally—it was free back in 2019, and its sequel was free in 2020. But if you missed it back then, here's your chance to get caught up.

The Escapists is free on the Epic Store until September 30, which is when EU4 will step into the breach. For more free games, keep your eyes on our list.

Dying Light 2’s next developer stream will focus on the game’s open world

Posted on September 23, 2021 by

The developers of Dying Light 2: Stay Human will host a fourth episode of the Dying 2 Know series on September 30

You will be able to tune in at 12pm PT, 3pm ET, and at 8pm UK on Techland’s Twitch channel.

This time out, the episode will focus on the game’s open world and feature a surprise.

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Warhammer 40,000: Fireteam Review

Posted on September 23, 2021 by

Games Workshop is best known for its miniatures games, Warhammer 40k and Age of Sigmar. But these present a significant barrier to new players in terms of digesting rules and collecting a whole army to put into the field. As such, it has long offered cut-down, introductory versions to entice the unwary.

The latest is Warhammer 40,000: Fireteam, in which a squad of close-combat Space Marines take on the sinister, robotic Necrons. However, Fireteam takes a fresh approach by adopting a stripped-down version of the miniatures rules for what is inarguably a board game. It has cards, a hex grid and there’s not a range ruler to be seen.

What’s in the Box

Fireteam doesn’t look like much when you slide off the lid. Underneath a double-sided board, each surface printed with an abstract sci-fi battlefield, are a bunch of nondescript orange and white cards of various sizes. It’s when you realize that the box is deeper than the storage tray that the magic happens. Beneath are three sprues of brilliant miniatures.

You’ll need tools, time and ideally some glue to assemble them, but the results are amazing. The five Marine figures are outstanding, energetic and elegant despite their bulky armor. Their thirteen Necron opponents are harder to assemble and less striking to behold, but still detailed and disquieting.

The five Marine figures are outstanding, energetic and elegant despite their bulky armor.

Among the box contents are rules and cards for four other Fireteams that don’t have included models. They’re all factions from the 40k universe: Tau, Eldar, Orks and Imperial Guard and each corresponds to a single of models you can buy separately.

Rules and How It Plays

Fireteam uses a simplified version of the Kill Team rules, which are themselves a simplified version of the full Warhammer 40k rules. When you activate a model it gains a certain number of action points it can spend to move and fire. In combat you choose a weapon and roll its specified number of dice, trying to get its to-hit number. The target then rolls its specified number of defense dice, trying to get its armor save number to cancel any hits.

Because this is a board game rather than a miniatures game, it can do away with the often clumsy rules required for measured movement. Instead, when you move or check range, you count hexes. To determine a line of sight, you draw a bead from the center of one hex to the middle of the target. It’s clean and fast, as you’d want a firefight game to be.

You wouldn’t imagine, however, that such a basic framework would offer many strategies, but Fireteam gets its missions, boards, and cards to do the lifting in this department. There are twelve missions, each supposedly representing the pivotal moment of a larger battle. The introductory one puts the teams in opposite corners, seeking to control two objective hexes. Things escalate from there into terrain interactions, fetch and carry missions, and many more besides.

Each gives you particular ways to score points which often have little to do with eliminating enemy combatants. As such, it’s quite common to see your squad decimated and still win, one of several ideas it’s taken from its sister title Warhammer Underworlds. Others include its tight three-turn structure, keeping things tense, and giving each player a hand of objective cards. These give bonus points for fulfilling particular goals, like keeping your models spaced several hexes apart.

Fireteam uses a simplified version of the Kill Team rules, which are themselves a simplified version of the full Warhammer 40k rules.

The two included Fireteams are also very different in character. The Marines are fast and have the edge in melee. The Necrons, by contrast, are lethal at range but have a special rule that means they can’t take the same action twice. In practice this makes them ponderously slow, leaving a single model only able to move six hexes for the entire game. To compensate they have three fast but weak scarab swarms.

All the Fireteams have their own unique strengths and weaknesses. Alongside the combat stats, each also has three ploys, special abilities of which they can activate one per turn. Those of the Marines center around combat boosts and claiming objectives. The Necrons, meanwhile, can make up for their slow speed by warping a single model across the board or reanimating fallen warriors. Making good use of these at the right time can help to swing the game in your favor.

Each mission thus becomes a strategic puzzle in how to use cover, terrain and the unique qualities of your soldiers to achieve objectives. For that first, objective-based mission, the Necrons must work out how they can stop the speedy Marines from claiming those objectives on the first turn and gaining an unstoppable lead. Among other issues, this involves coordinating movement on their crowded starting area to ensure the lumbering robots don’t block each other’s line of sight.

Of course, in a three-turn game where every attack and defense pivots on a fistful of dice, “strategy” is perhaps too strong a word. But unless you’re dedicated to the deepest fare, solving each scenario puzzle despite the best efforts of the dice to thwart you offers a pleasing balancing of tension and tactics. Once the best approach to a mission is understood, the dice become more decisive. But the way missions prioritize objectives over kills tends to swing the balance away from combat and toward strategy.

Although the asymmetry is a key part of Fireteam’s appeal, it does lead to some rather unintuitive rules. Each side gets to activate eight models per turn, which means that the Marines will end up activating at least one model more than once. A second activation only gets a single action, and you focus all your extra activations on the same model if you want. While this offers some fun tactical possibilities, it simply feels wrong to have a single warrior running halfway across the board and laying down a hail of fire all in the same turn.

There’s another aspect that throws a robotic wrench into the otherwise smooth gears of Fireteam, which is the sheer number of counters it uses. Models accrue counters to track wounds, activations and status effects. Stacks of large counters on a crowded board quickly become very hard to track, losing cohesion over which model owns which stack. And at the end of each turn, you must ferret out the non-wound ones without displacing the others. It’s a clumsy, awkward administrative task that sticks out badly in such a fast-playing game.

Where To Buy

Warhammer 40,000: Fireteam retails for $49.99 and is available at select local hobby stores, as well as at the national retailers below.

Disney Classic Games Collection coming to current-gen consoles and PC

Posted on September 23, 2021 by

Disney Classic Games Collection has been announced for PC, PS4, Switch, and Xbox One.

The Disney Classic Games Collection will contain both Aladdin games, The Jungle Book, and The Lion King, Nighthawk Interactive has announced.

The 16-bit games allow you to play Disney characters such as Aladdin, Simba, and Mowgli and the ability to play through multiple versions of each game and experience new features, enhancements, game modes, easy game saves, and display options.

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The best gaming chairs in 2021 The best gaming chairs guide header image with Logitech Herman Miller Embody chair and Secretlab Titan Evo 2022 on a green background with PC Gamer recommend badge.

Posted on September 23, 2021 by


The best gaming chair is the perfect finishing touch to a modern PC gaming setup. It really will bring your whole desktop together and make it look supremely suave. Yet these gaming thrones are good for more than style points, the top gaming chairs will also give your weary back an ample place to rest. This helps explain why they can be so costly—keeping you in one piece isn't a cheap endeavour. If you've spent thousands of dollars on an extreme gaming PC build, it's only fair to give your gaming chair just as much attention. 

If you're simply looking for everyday comfort, the best gaming seats may seem over the top. With wannabe-racer bucket seats, and gaming chairs covered in satanic runes running rampant, we've made sure to include a few sleek office-style chairs in here too. Whichever route you go down, keep your posture in mind. It may be the last thing on your mind as you embark on a ten-hour raid, but we implore you: Don't disregard ergonomics.

We've tested tens of gaming chairs from today's most well-known companies to find luxurious and affordable places to park your rear. Check those out below. And if the chairs are a bit rich for your butt, then our cheap gaming chair roundup may be more up your street.

Best gaming chairs

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Secretlab Titan Evo 2022 gaming chair on a grey background at various 360° angles.

(Image credit: Secretlab)
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Secretlab Titan Evo 2022 gaming chair on a grey background at various 360° angles.

(Image credit: Secretlab)
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Secretlab Titan Evo 2022 gaming chair on a grey background at various 360° angles.

(Image credit: Secretlab)
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Secretlab Titan Evo 2022 gaming chair on a grey background at various 360° angles.

(Image credit: Secretlab)
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Secretlab Titan Evo 2022 gaming chair on a grey background at various 360° angles.

(Image credit: Secretlab)
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Secretlab Titan Evo 2022 gaming chair on a grey background at various 360° angles.

(Image credit: Secretlab)

1. Secretlab Titan Evo 2022

The best gaming chair made even better

Seat type: Racing back, levelled seat base | Recline: 165 degrees | Weight capacity: Up to 180 kg (397 lbs, XL size only) | Weight: 37.5 kg (83 lbs) | Warranty: 3-year

Magnetic cushion and covers
Very comfortable
Everything we want in a gaming chair feature-wise
Pricier than older Secretlab chairs
3-year warranty isn't a match for some ergo chairs

The Secretlab Titan Evo 2022 is everything we've been looking for in a gaming chair. That's why it's rightfully taken the top spot in our best gaming chair guide from the previous incumbent, the Secretlab Titan. It was an easy decision to make, though. The Secretlab Titan Evo 2022 does everything the Titan, and Omega below, can, except better.

User-friendly ergonomics make the Titan Evo 2022 a great fit for long nights gaming or eight hours tapping away for work, and that comes down to its superb built-in back support. It's highly adjustable, which means you can nail down a great fit with ease. There's also something to be said for the 4D armrests, comfortable seat rest, and magnetic head cushion.

You read that right, a magnetic head cushion. A simple solution to fiddly straps, the Titan Evo 2022 does away with all that with a couple of powerful magnets.

Secretlab also reckons its new Neo Hybrid Leatherette material is more durable than ever, though there's still the option for the Softweave fabric we've raved about in the past.

The chair is available in three sizes: S, R, and XL.

As a complete package, then, the Secretlab Titan Evo 2022 is the archetype of a great gaming chair. It is a little pricier than its predecessors, but we think it's worth the price tag. And anyways, that higher price tag is why we still recommend the Omega below for a cheaper option while stock lasts.

Read our full Secretlab Titan Evo 2022 review.

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Secretlab OMEGA 2020 Series gaming chair on a grey background.

(Image credit: SecretLab)
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Secretlab OMEGA 2020 Series gaming chair on a grey background.

(Image credit: Secretlab)
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Secretlab OMEGA 2020 Series gaming chair on a grey background.

(Image credit: Secretlab)
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Secretlab OMEGA 2020 Series gaming chair on a grey background.

(Image credit: Secretlab)
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Secretlab OMEGA 2020 Series gaming chair on a grey background.

(Image credit: Secretlab)

2. Secretlab Omega

The more affordable Secretlab chair

Seat type: Racing seat | Recline: 165 degrees | Weight capacity: 109 kg (240 lbs) | Weight: 30 kg (66 lbs) | Warranty: 3-year

Velour memory foam pillows
Versatile tilt mechanism 
Lacking height adjustment on head pillow

The Secretlab Omega is one of the most finely constructed chairs we've tested, and although it has largely been replaced by the Titan Evo 2022 above nowadays, the higher price tag of that chair might see the Omega remain a popular option for those looking to save a little cash.

From the casters to the base, the lift mechanism, armrests, and seat back, Secretlab has used some of the best materials available. The Omega was upgraded with Secretlab's 2020 series of improvements, which includes premium metal in the armrest mechanism, making it silky smooth to adjust and even more durable, and adding the company's ridiculously durable PU Leather 2.0. 

The chair features a high-quality, cold-cured foam to provide support. It feels a little firm at first but gets more comfortable after extended use. The Omega stands out from the crowd with its velour memory foam lumbar and head pillows. These are so comfortable that we could smoothly fully recline the chair and take a nap if we wanted to. Though that's not a great look in the office… If you're looking to treat your body with a chair that will genuinely last, the Secretlab Omega is worth every penny.

Read our full Secretlab Omega review.

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Logitech G x Herman Miller Embody

(Image credit: Herman Miller, Logitech)
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Herman Miller X Logitech G Embody Gaming Chair

(Image credit: Herman Miller, Logitech)
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Herman Miller X Logitech G Embody Gaming Chair

(Image credit: Herman Miller, Logitech)
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Herman Miller X Logitech G Embody Gaming Chair

(Image credit: Herman Miller, Logitech)
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Herman Miller X Logitech G Embody Gaming Chair

(Image credit: Herman Miller, Logitech)

3. Logitech G x Herman Miller Embody

The best ergonomic gaming chair

Seat type: Task chair | Material: Multi-layer fabric | Seat height: 17–22 inch | Weight capacity: 136 kg (300 lbs) | Weight: 23 kg (51 lbs) | Warranty: 12-year

Stimulates blood and oxygen flow
Unrivaled back support
12-year/24hr use warranty
Jaw-droppingly expensive

Perhaps you've heard of the Herman Miller Embody. It occupied a top position in our best office chair roundup for a long time, but that has come to an end. Not for lack of comfort or acclaim, simply because the famed chair manufacturer has partnered up with Logitech to create something tailor-made to our gaming rumps.

Admittedly, the Logitech G x Herman Miller Embody doesn't differ much from its commercial cousin. That's hardly a mark against it, however. The Embody's cascading back support design and absurdly high quality make a welcome return but now comes with a few more flourishes to win over gamers. Specifically, extra cooling material designed to support a more active gaming position.

It's not so much the changes that make the Embody stand out as one of the best gaming chairs going. It's what's been kept the same. The tried and tested Embody design is simply one of the best chairs for office work or gaming. It's incredibly comfortable over prolonged use, supports an active and healthy posture, and is easily fitted to your frame.

The warranty, too, is a standout feature. At 12 years, including labor, and rated to 24-hour use over that time, it's a chair that is guaranteed to last you over a decade, if not longer. So while the initial price tag may seem steep, and that it is, the reality is you're certain to get your money's worth in the long run. And your back will be thankful for it, too.

Read our full Herman Miller Logitech G Embody review.

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(Image credit: Secretlab)
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(Image credit: Secretlab)
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(Image credit: Secretlab)

4. NeueChair

The best office chair for gaming

Seat type: Task chair | Recline: 85–130 degrees | Weight capacity: 108 kg (240 lbs) | Weight: 29 kg (64 lbs) | Warranty: 12-year

Ridiculously sturdy and well made
Comfortable and supportive
Highly adjustable
Uninspiring design

If you're the sort of person who prioritizes functionality over flash, the NeueChair is an excellent option. This isn't to say it's not stylish—quite the opposite; the NeueChair comes in a sleek, muted obsidian or flashy chrome/silver, both with bold, sweet curved supports on the back and an attractive black mesh. But, more importantly, the NeueChair is built to last, with a heavy, sturdy industrial construction. Even the chair's weight in the packaging indicates a solid piece of carefully constructed industrial art: it's heavy and substantial. 

Assembling it is a breeze, as it comes in two discrete pieces and is simply a matter of inserting the casters and then pushing the two parts together. Almost every aspect of the seat is adjustable, from the armrests to the lumbar support system that lets you change the height depth of the backrest. It's one of the best office chairs I've ever had the pleasure to sit in, and if you can afford the admittedly steep price tag, well worth the investment.

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Andaseat Kaiser II gaming chair from various angles on a grey background

(Image credit: Andaseat)
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Andaseat Kaiser II gaming chair from various angles on a grey background

(Image credit: Andaseat)
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Andaseat Kaiser II gaming chair from various angles on a grey background

(Image credit: Andaseat)

5. AndaSeat Kaiser 2

The best gaming chair for a larger frame

Seat type: Racing seat | Recline: 90–160 degrees | Weight capacity: 180 kg (397 lbs) | Weight: 33 kg (73 lbs) | Warranty: 5-year

Sturdy
Perfect for big and tall gamers
Extra large lumbar support and neck pillow
Bulky
Lackluster armrests

If you're a big and tall gamer, you might have noticed that there aren't many gaming chairs that can support your unique build. Whether it's a lower weight capacity or too short, or even feels like it'll break as soon as you sit in it, finding a chair for you might seem nearly impossible.

The AndaSeat Kaiser 2 screams large and in charge, supporting gamers up to 397lbs and 7ft tall. The Kaiser 2 is built on a solid steel frame with oversized bars to provide support. 

Covered in premium PVC leather and extra thick memory foam cushioning, the Kaiser 2 manages to look more like a gaming chair for grownups. Available in black and a lovely maroon, no more will have to stuff yourself into a tiny gaming chair hope for the best. The Kaiser 2 manages to do both the function, comfort, and style you want in your premium gaming chair. 

Read our full AndaSeat Kaiser 2 gaming chair review.

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Noblechairs Hero gaming chair on a grey background.

(Image credit: Noblechairs)
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Noblechairs Hero gaming chair on a grey background.

(Image credit: Noblechairs)
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Noblechairs Hero gaming chair on a grey background.

(Image credit: Noblechairs)

Noblechairs Hero

6. Noblechairs Hero

The best gaming chair for back support

Seat type: Racing seat | Recline: 90–135 degrees | Weight capacity: 150 kg (330 lbs) | Weight: 28 kg (62 lbs) | Warranty: 2-year

Great for lumbar support
Ideal for larger frames
Has a firm seat and back-rest…
A bit firm
Armrests could be comfier

When buying a gaming chair, it's easy to forget your health. After all, most are advertised as luxurious, cushioned thrones that soothe your every ache as you smash the crap out of your foes in Apex Legends. But that isn't true, and for some, it's important to pick a chair that takes back support seriously. With some of the team have used it daily for almost a year, we can thoroughly recommend the Noblechairs Hero in uPVC leather. While not the most exciting of chairs, or the sportiest, it certainly does a good job of taking care of your back.

The Hero is easy to assemble, except for the bit where you attach the back to the seat, so make sure you have a buddy for that. It's firm and supportive, and extremely sturdy. As a word of warning: it is substantial, so if you prefer a softer chair that isn't as good for your lumbar, this maybe isn't for you. 

Aside from that, it has a decent recline, can withstand frames of up to 330 lbs, and has fully adjustable armrests. It's heavy but glides pretty easily on the supplied casters. It'll look just fine in both an office or gaming setup, so you're getting a chair that can do both. Not bad, if you can afford it.

Read our full Noblechairs Hero Doom Edition review.

Best gaming keyboard | Best VR headset | Best mechanical keyboard| Best wireless gaming mouse | Best wireless gaming keyboard 

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Corsair T3 Rush gaming chair on a grey background.

(Image credit: Corsair)
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Corsair T3 Rush gaming chair on a grey background.

(Image credit: Corsair)
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Corsair T3 Rush gaming chair on a grey background.

(Image credit: Corsair)
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Corsair T3 Rush gaming chair on a grey background.

(Image credit: Corsair)

7. Corsair T3 Rush

A simple gaming chair with style

Seat type: Racing seat | Recline: 90–170 degrees | Weight capacity: 120 (265 lbs) | Weight: 23 kg (50 lbs) | Warranty: 2-years

Breathable soft fabric
4D armrests
Memory Foam Lumbar Pillow
180-degree recline
Not for the tall or large-framed

Corsair's latest addition to its lineup of premium gaming chairs, the T3 Rush, has gotten a much-needed facelift. The T3 Rush is an insanely comfy chair thanks to its memory foam lumbar pillow but, more importantly, uses a breathable soft fabric in place of faux leather. The benefit of this is that it retains less heat, keeping you fresh and comfy instead of sweating in your squeaky pleather.

The Rush also reclines to a ridiculous 180 degrees in case you wanted to lie back and take a comfy cat nap before you take on another marathon streaming session of Apex Legends or CS: GO.

The only major downside of the T3 Rush is it is designed for smaller-framed users. If you require a little larger seat, the T3 will be an uncomfortably tight fit. Other than that, the T3 Rush is an impressive-looking gaming chair that doesn't need a loud color to make a statement.

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DXRacer Master on a grey background.

(Image credit: DXRacer)
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DXRacer Master on a grey background.

(Image credit: DXRacer)
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DXRacer Master on a grey background.

(Image credit: DXRacer)
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DXRacer Master on a grey background.

(Image credit: DXRacer)

8. DXRacer Master

A real money-no-object option

Seat type: Racing seat | Recline: 155 degrees | Weight capacity: 160 kg (353 lbs) | Weight: 34 kg (74 lbs) | Warranty: 2-year (accessories), lifetime (frame)

Modular
Built-in lumbar support
Sturdy and comfortable
Headrest lacks much adjustment
Assembly will require help
Cut the cord…

(Image credit: Steelseries)

Best wireless gaming mouse: ideal cable-free rodents
Best wireless gaming keyboard: no wires, no worries
Best wireless gaming headset: top untethered audio

The DXRacer Master is a chair for people with money to spend, but it justifies the price by being an extremely luxuriant and comfortable chair. What's more, the DXRacer Master can be customized with modular parts (sold at an added cost) like mesh seat and backrests, leg rests, and even a rotating arm that bolts onto the base and can hold anything from a laptop to your phone.

Choosing not to invest in these extra parts won't compromise the chair itself, though, because DXRacer went all out on its features. Built-in lumbar support and an adjustable, rail-mounted headrest are great features, along with 4D armrests. The microfiber leather is especially nice, and much of the chair is made of metal, which makes it feel sturdy.

It's clear that the DXRacer Master was built to last, and its understated look is great if you're not into the flashy designs seen on most other gaming chairs. But, boy, it will cost you for all this luxury: The DXRacer Master is still $80 more than the Secret Lab Omega, our favorite chair. But it's worth considering if you want to go all out and get something with all the bells and whistles.

Read our full DXRacer Master review.

The best gaming chairs FAQ

Should you use a gaming chair?

Between recent articles about the effects of sitting down on your body and our experimentation with standing desks, you might think PC Gamer has fallen out of love with the humble chair. That could not be further from the truth. As gamers and office workers, we spend a significant chunk of each day sitting on our money makers in front of screens. Given that most of us don’t plan to change that anytime soon, it only makes sense to do so in a great chair. So that’s what I set out to find.

We wanted to find chairs that maximized comfort, support, and value. We spoke with Melissa Afterman, MS CPE, a Senior Principal Ergonomist with VSI Risk Management & Ergonomics, Inc., who specializes in workstation setups. 

“Absolutely, chairs are still okay,” she told me. “Yes, we know that sitting too long is bad for you. The reality is that standing too long is just as bad for you, so the answer is movement. Taking breaks, getting up at least every hour and moving, or changing your position from standing to sitting every hour so that you’re not standing too long either.”

“If you’re typing and working at the computer, you really want more upright support so that you can maintain neutral spine posture and let the chair hold you up,” she said. “But when you switch to a gaming mode, you may want to recline a little bit to relax your lower back while still having good support in that position. So a locking backrest and/or some tension control is important.”

Another feature to look for, though it tends to be found on more expensive models, is a seat pan slider. This enables you to slide the positioning of your butt forwards or backward relative to the backrest. 

Are gaming chairs really worth it?

The best gaming chairs will complete your PC setup, not just from an aesthetic point of view, but because you will likely be spending hours sat in front of your machine, they will give you the support needed to keep your spine healthy too.

Is a gaming chair better than an office chair?

Nope! You can find good or bad examples of both, and believe us there are plenty. That said, some office chairs are great for gaming and vice versa, and there are ‘office chairs’, like the Herman Miller Embody, that blend the line between both.

Really it’s about finding what’s right for you, and a lot of the time that’s a gaming chair because, let’s be honest, you like the look of it. That’s a perfectly good reason to make that decision, just make sure you’re not sacrificing comfort and ergonomics for style and flair.

A cheap office chair can be a great pick if you want to save cash and be comfy.

Are gaming chairs good for your posture?

The best gaming chairs look out for you and your back. When it comes to chair design, lumbar support is vital. The first thing you should look for in a new gaming chair is whether it has any built-in support to help your body maintain an ideal posture. Some even come with lumbar support pillows that work to some extent. Multi-adjustable arm-rests, upholstery, and general style are also important; note these features aren’t cheap.

Does every gaming chair fit every body type?

Different chair models accommodate different heights and weights, so make sure to check your fit. Look at the width and depth of the seat, too. Some chairs claim that you should sit cross-legged, but that depends on your size and legs’ length.

Halo Infinite’s Big Team Battle Has a Cool Area That’s Also a Sly Destiny Reference

Posted on September 23, 2021 by

343 Industries recently showed off some more multiplayer action for Halo Infinite ahead of the game's back-to-back multiplayer tech previews starting this weekend. PC gameplay of a Big Team Battle CTF match on Fragmentation showed a little more of what fans can expect from Infinite when it launches later this year as well as an introduction to the game's very own loot cave – seemingly a reference to Halo creator Bungie's Destiny.

As broadcast from Halo's official YouTube channel, community director Brian Jarrard was joined by Fernando Reyez Medina to speak about some of the gameplay elements shown off in Big Team Battle. During the match, (starting at around the 9:17 in the video below), the pair come across a large fortified door protecting what Medina says the team internally refers to as the "loot cave" – a seemingly quiet nod to a similarly named area removed from Destiny.

Medina explains that accessing the cave's huge vault is something of a sub-objective during a match. For the team that does so first, powerful weapons and items can be found inside for the taking. In order to gain access to the loot cave, players must set their AI to work hacking through its entrance while they fend off enemy assaults.

As opening the loot cave isn't strictly part of a team's main objectives during the game, players will need to consider whether losing squad members to the loot cave cause is a worthwhile investment in their overall pursuits for victory. Either way, the area around the cave's entrance is almost sure to see its fair share of gunfire when Infinite launches later this year as teams look to wield its powerful treasures. It's a nice risk-reward feature, designed to bring players together in one small area in a large map.

The term "loot cave" very much comes with its own associations beyond Halo. Located behind Skywatch on Earth, Destiny's original loot cave was a respawn zone in which players would exploit the game to farm enemies for drops and experience. Patching the loot cave into a haunted Easter Egg was one of the first of many changes made to Destiny after it first launched. Bungie explained at the time that it made changes to the area in order to improve Destiny's standard progression for players. Given that Bungie created the Halo series, 343's use of the term – even if it isn't officially called a loot cave in the game – is a nice nod to the connection between the companies.

Halo's Big Team Battle is set to feature in the second week of the game's upcoming technical preview. For more on Infinite, including how 343 believes that bots will improve its multiplayer experience and a look at its new training mode, make sure to check out our dedicated page for the game.

Jared Moore is a freelance writer for IGN. You can follow him on Twitter.

eFootball Preview: PES Is Dead, Long Live eFootball

Posted on September 23, 2021 by

Football gaming is perhaps the most stagnant of all sports genres. FIFA’s pay-to-win, arcade hegemony lords it over PES’ clunky menus, but realistic gameplay. Rinse, reskin, and repeat.

But this year that’s all changing. And when I went to Konami’s Windsor HQ for a hands-on event for eFootball – yes, the PES, aka Pro Evolution Soccer moniker is dead – I was intrigued as much by the gameplay as by their vision to make this bold experiment the future of sports games.

Happily, the pre-release build I got my mitts on was excellent fun. That build was a hybrid of pre- and post-release. So some advanced gameplay mechanics that won’t be coming to the game until later this autumn (essentially, variations of shots and passes) were included, but other key features, such as PS5 haptics, were missing.

Devs mentioned the words “simulation,” “intensity,” and “physicality” multiple times. And I think that, based on what I’ve played so far, Konami has largely delivered. Each one-on-one feels like a chess match in miniature. eFootball invites you to get your shoulders – even elbows – stuck into the opposition to battle for possession, with this year’s ball feeling pleasingly untethered to your player’s foot. Football games have historically had a tendency to ‘lock on’ to the ball when at your control, but here the ball feels like a volatile, independent object that needs to be taken care of or hunted down – much like the real thing.

This invites the defending player to press high and hard, referencing modern football nicely. Jurgen Klopp would be proud. I actually think pressing is slightly overpowered in the build I played – but I expect a lot of balancing tweaks will be applied in eFootball’s weekly updates after launch. Think of pressing as a slightly overpowered SMG on Warzone. Hopefully it doesn’t get nerfed entirely, just brought down a touch.

A new feature much vaunted by Konami is the ability to quickly recycle the ball after going out for a throw, including the addition of ballboys. This is hardly ground-breaking (FIFA has had quick throws for years now) but eFootball’s quick goal kicks specifically are an exciting new weapon to exploit an opponent’s limited attention span. I myself nearly got caught out from a quick CPU restart, meaning the ball was already bypassing my midfield before I had turned back to the screen. It’s a fun system that might truly allow us to live out our Trent Alexander-Arnold/Divock Origi quick-set-pieces of dreams.

eFootball also takes aim at some of the series’ historical failings. PES 2020 (and the reskinned 2021) had particularly painful commentary, menus, and refereeing. Pleasingly, all three are much improved. While not flawless, commentary is much more invisible and immersive. Referees can still frustrate, but are much fairer than last year’s officials, who were intensely relaxed about on-pitch assault and battery.

But the big win here is in the menus. Konami has finally binned PES’ teeth-gnashingly awful aesthetics for a modern and clean system. Changing players, kits, and the weather and time of day is far less taxing than before. At their best, some menus were actually downright pretty. Again, I played a very limited demo build, so this will be put to the test when it comes to more complex game modes and team management. But so far, so good.

Another area that the eFootball team have overhauled is the camera, creating a new ‘duel’ camera system, dynamically zooming in to isolate key on-the-ball battles, before zooming out to show the full tapestry for those raking, cross-field passes. I expected this to become frustrating quickly – and if it is, you can turn it off. But I was pleasantly surprised by how refined this camera system is already. It’s a promising new tool.

Intrigued to see how all this combined into one cohesive, competitive experience, I quickly jumped into matches against the devs and got a sense of how eFootball plays in a competitive context. My possession tactics and high line were punished by my counter-attacking opponents – but, conversely, I could inventively invite their pressure and punish them. It was fun and, crucially, fair.

Questions do linger though. While this was a gameplay event, the new F2P model was the large elephant-as-service in the room. The initial offering is sparse, launching with the game on the 30th of September with just a handful of teams and a pinch of modes. The major fall update, which sees the game launching on mobile and offering a more fleshed out suite of modes, has to create a moreish offering that keeps players coming back across all major platforms (which sadly doesn’t as-yet include Switch).

eFootball’s success ultimately lives or dies based upon its post-launch appeal and support.

Clearly, the idea is to foster the kind of competitive, cross-platform infrastructure only seen thus far in the battle-royale format. But that ambition leads to questions of its own. This is a “console-first” experience, but it seems like the PS5 is particularly favoured – especially the DualSense controller. Haptic implementation was a feature that the devs seem particularly proud of, mentioned several times. Will Xbox and last-gen players be left behind?

This could be a new dawn for football games – I really respect the ambition of the team behind the gameplay, and they’ve hit upon a core loop that hooked me in the session, and has left me wanting more. So that’s half of the job well done. But with FIFA still ever dominant, and new upstarts like UFL waiting in the wings, eFootball’s success ultimately lives or dies based upon its post-launch appeal and support. Time will tell.

Daniel Curtis is a freelance writer, producer and filmmaker. He’s also a long-suffering Chesterfield FC fan. Say hi to him on Twitter @danielpdcurtis.

Death Stranding Director’s Cut downgrades from Monster energy drinks to store brand

Posted on September 23, 2021 by

Death Stranding is full of product placements. We’ve known that about it since before it even came out. When it did release, players discovered a host of other, less obvious ads for real-world products, such as Norman Reedus’ biker travelogue show.

But none was more blatant than Monster energy drinks, which not only show up everywhere in-game, they’re tied into a game mechanic: drinking them boosts Sam’s stamina. Given how the entirety of Death Stranding is about travelling vast distances to deliver packages, stamina is a crucial element.

The Death Stranding Director’s Cut, which launches tomorrow on PS5, adds a host of new missions, new items, and refines existing mechanics. But there’s more, because for some reason, Kojima and co. decided to axe Monster energy drinks from the game.

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Running out of room for your games? Add more storage with this 2TB SSD for $165 A WD Blue SATA SSD close up, top down view, on a grey background.

Posted on September 23, 2021 by


For anyone in need of extra storage and who doesn't mind getting a song stuck in their head all day, here's a chance to save a few bucks on what is already an aggressively priced solid state drive, the WD Blue 2TB. It's listed for $169.99 on eBay, with coupon code IMBLUEDABADEE knocking $5 off at checkout.

If you don't get the reference, then definitely don't click this link—it's one of those tunes that isn't easily scrubbed from the brain. You clicked, didn't you? Hey, you were warned, a courtesy that wasn't extended when Rickrolling was at its height of popularity.

Seondary Storage Deal

WD Blue 2TB SSD | $189.99 $164.99 at eBay (save $25)
This would make a great secondary drive for your games, videos, and anything else that is quickly filling up your main drive. It would also suffice as a primary drive, if you don’t need the added speed of NVMe. If it doesn’t get applied automatically, use coupon code IMBLUEDABADEE at checkout for the full discount.

Western Digital lists this drive at $189.99 at its webstore, down from $239.99. The discounted price is closer to what it actually goes for these days. So this deal doesn't represent a ginormous discount, but it is a great price for 2TB of SSD storage, from a name-brand manufacturer, no less.

The caveat is that it's a SATA-based SSD in the 2.5-inch form factor. You're not going to get the same speed as an NVMe drive, especially newer PCIe 4.0 models that push reads into 7,000MB/s territory, or the convenience of the M.2 form factor. But you do get a lot of storage for the money.

It's similar in specs to Crucial's MX500, which adorns our list of the best SSDs for gaming, as a secondary drive. Western Digital rates the sequential read and write speeds at 560MB/s and 530MB/s, respectively. Those are close to the upper limits of SATA-based SSDs.

While not on par with NVMe SSDs, SATA-based models will still make your system feel faster and respond much quicker than a hard drive, if you're still using one of those as your primary storage. Even for gaming, NVMe doesn't bring much of a tangible performance boost over SATA just yet, though that could change when developers begin taking advantage of Microsoft's DirectStorage API.

You'll have to decide for yourself if going the SATA route makes sense. If the answer is yes, this is one of the best values around for an SSD that straddles the line as bulk storage.